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Ultrafast Rechargeable Aluminum-ion Battery

Know ITRI’s ultrafast rechargeable aluminum-ion battery in 90 seconds
The stable aluminum-ion battery does not catch fire even if damaged by drillingThe stable aluminum-ion battery does not catch fire even if damaged by drilling

The ultrafast rechargeable aluminum-ion battery is made of an aluminum anode and a graphite cathode. Researchers from ITRI and Stanford University used the layered structure of graphite to allow chloroaluminate anions to perform the intercalation and deintercalation reactions.

Furthermore, they opened the structure of graphite (i.e., graphitic foam) to speed up the charging/discharging reactions of the battery cell. As a result, the battery cell exhibits great durability as it can stand up to 10,000 charge-discharge cycles without capacity decay, and can be charged within one minute.

The graphitic materials used for the battery cell are as flexible and supple as paper, and very stable. The basic component of the liquid electrolyte is aluminum salt, so it is stable at room temperature. The battery can withstand drilling tests during the discharge process and still continue to supply electricity, attesting to its safety.

Three major breakthroughs were achieved in developing the ultrafast rechargeable aluminum-ion batteries: 1. discovery of the perfect combination of aluminum and graphite as the battery cell; 2. the whole battery cell is as supple as paper, and can be mass produced for various demands and product attributes; 3. the stability and durability which make the battery safe even if damaged by an external force.

This breakthrough battery technology will compete with the traditional lead acid battery when applied in large energy storage devices, lightweight electric scooters and motorized bicycles. In addition to small smart devices, aluminum-ion batteries could be used to store renewable energy in electricity grids, electric motorcycles and bicycles.

The research result has been published in Nature.

ITRI and Stanford University collaborated in developing an ultrafast rechargeable aluminum-ion battery and the research result has been published in the journal Nature
ITRI and Stanford University collaborated in developing an ultrafast rechargeable aluminum-ion battery and the research result has been published in the journal Nature
The thin battery cell is as supple as paper, and can be easily mass produced
The thin battery cell is as supple as paper, and can be easily mass produced

Contact

Ms. Vivian Hsieh

Email: vivianHsieh@itri.org.tw

  

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