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Experiences of the US, Europe and Japan to Help Create New Future in Sustainable Energy for Taiwan

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Experiences of the US, Europe and Japan to Help Create New Future in Sustainable Energy for Taiwan

The workshop gathered experts from around the world to share their experiences.
The workshop gathered experts from around the world to share their experiences.

Sustainable energy is a goal that the world is working together to achieve. Developed countries throughout the globe are reducing their reliance on traditional power generation sources and embracing renewable energy. Taiwan is also participating in this movement, setting a target of having renewables account for 20% of its energy needs by 2025. Therefore, how to increase the ratio of renewable energies, solve the problem of intermittent energy generation, and maintain stable power supply have become the nation’s challenges. The Workshop on Strategy for a Sustainable Energy Future, which was organized by ITRI, called on experts from local and foreign industry, academia, and power companies to share what they see as successful factors in the development of renewable energies in the United States, the United Kingdom, and Japan. These insights will help to create a new future for sustainable energy in Taiwan.  

 

Deputy Minister of the Ministry of Economic Affairs (MOEA) Wen-Sheng Tseng commented that in order to meet the challenges brought about the transformation in energy sources, Taiwan Power Company (Taipower) has developed renewable energy power generation forecasting technology, established a smart grid, and invested in updating and expanding gas generating units. At the same time, Taipower has adjusted the strategies of its power dispatching systems. The MOEA in 2017 launched a regional energy storage demonstration initiative as part of an effort to create a grid-level storage plan. He believes that the Workshop will help pinpoint Taiwan's future power grid needs in response to the needs of the energy transition, while also enhancing communication and interaction among various sectors.

 

ITRI President Edwin Liu stated that the international community is paying close attention to topics such as the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. With an increasing focus on the development of renewable energies, Taiwan must start with power plants and smart grids, along with management of demand and energy storage in an effort to promote the development of renewables and enhance Taiwan's economic competitiveness, he said, adding that Taiwan must play its part in ensuring global environmental sustainability. The government, the public, and power companies all play vital roles in energy transition, he explained, specifically pointing out that participants at the workshop shared international experience in an effort to accelerate Taiwan's energy transition.

 

There are three main ways for Taiwan to develop renewable energy. First, a consensus must be reached among the public and relevant issues must be addressed. Second, renewable energy development technologies must continue to be honed to solve concerns such as intermittency, power dispatching, and energy storage issues. Taiwan needs to continue to engage in R&D or introduce experiences from overseas to overcome these problems. Third, greater participation is required by customers, as the power system is a comprehensive system involving generation, transmission and usage. Power users are no longer purely consumers, but rather prosumers. This concept must take root in order to build the foundation for renewable energy throughout the power supply chain.

 

The Workshop invited Director of Energy Systems Research Center at University of Texas at Arlington Wei-Jen Lee; Southern California Edison Co. Managing Director Bill Chu; Head of Applied Research of the UK's ORE Catapult Chong Ng; and Associate Professor at Meijo University Taisuke Masuta to share important observations.

 

Dr. Edwin Liu summed up the views of the experts into five major points: First, renewable energy is an international trend and Taiwan should not be absent in or ignore these developments; Second, Taiwan must courageously face and solve technical challenges brought about by renewable energy; Third, the public must reach a consensus on the development of renewable energy, and power users, the government, and power companies must cooperate; Fourth, renewable energy policies must be sustained, as success stories in many countries are the result of many years of efforts; Fifth, the industrial, public, academic, and research communities must cooperate and support the establishment of a renewable energy industry ecosystem, as this will underpin economic growth.

ITRI President Dr. Edwin Liu restates the five key points of the views of the foreign experts at the workshop.
ITRI President Dr. Edwin Liu restates the five key points of the views of the foreign experts at the workshop.